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A qualitative study exploring perceived environmental determinants of physical activity behaviour in children

Heyball, Felicity and Kirk, Alison and McCrorie, Paul and Knowles, Ann-Marie and Ellaway, Anne (2015) A qualitative study exploring perceived environmental determinants of physical activity behaviour in children. In: Journal of Youth Studies Conference, 2015-04-30 - 2015-05-01, Denmark.

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Abstract

In this article, we consider children’s perceptions of their social and physical outdoor environment in relation to their physical activity (PA) behaviour in Scotland, United Kingdom. Drawing from a pilot study, participants included three groups of children aged between ten and twelve of mixed gender (n=15). Visual and verbal representations of their perceived environment were analysed to assess environmental determinants of PA. Results found an absence of suitable play affordances, safety, parental restriction, and environmental aesthetics was a key factor to children spending time outdoors. Strengths and limitations of the study are discussed, as are implications for policy and practice.