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Open Access research with a European policy impact...

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EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

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Influence of super-shear earthquake rupture models on simulated near-source ground motion from the 1999 Izmit, Turkey, earthquake

Aochi, Hideo and Durand, Virginie and Douglas, John (2011) Influence of super-shear earthquake rupture models on simulated near-source ground motion from the 1999 Izmit, Turkey, earthquake. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 101 (2). pp. 726-741. ISSN 0037-1106

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Abstract

We numerically simulate seismic wave propagation from the 1999 Mw 7.4 earthquake in Izmit, Turkey, using a 3D finite difference method based on published finite-source models obtained by waveform inversions. This earthquake has been reported, based on observations at the near-fault station SKR, as an example of supershear rupture propagation toward the east. Although the modeled ground motion does show a characteristic Mach wave from the fault plane, it is difficult to identify any particular effects in terms of peak ground velocity (PGV), an important parameter in earthquake engineering. This is because the fault's spatial heterogeneity is strong enough to mask the properties of supershear rupture, which has been reported through several numerical simulations mostly based on homogeneous fault conditions. This article demonstrates the importance of studying ground motions for known earthquakes through numerical simulations based on finite-fault source models.