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A new model for high value meetings

Marshall, Pamela and Whitfield, Robert Ian and Duffy, Alex and Haffey, Mark (2015) A new model for high value meetings. In: 22nd EurOMA 2015, 2015-06-26 - 2015-07-01, University of Neuchâtel. (In Press)

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Abstract

The purpose of this research is to consider how organisations can increase competiveness by maximising the value of meetings whilst minimising their cost. This involves the development of a model which considers both the scheduling and management of meetings, whilst taking into account importance, value and cost where previously there has been no measure of these elements. This work will provide not only academic research within this under-represented area, but through a case study, a practical application. As time lost through unproductive meetings is estimated to cost billions, the potential saving through the application of this research is significant.