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A comparison between ducted turbine theory and inviscid simulation : Renewable Power Generation Conference (RPG 2013), 2nd IET

McLaren-Gow, S. and Jamieson, P. and Graham, J.M.R. (2013) A comparison between ducted turbine theory and inviscid simulation : Renewable Power Generation Conference (RPG 2013), 2nd IET. In: IET Renewable Power Generation Conference 2013, 2013-09-23.

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Abstract

This paper describes the use of an inviscid approach to model a ducted turbine and a comparison of simulation results with a particular one-dimensional theory. The aim of the investigation was to gain a better understanding of the ideal diffuser, a concept that is developed in the theory. An optimisation of duct shape and a set of simulations with a varied group of shapes showed that duct length, inlet radius and outlet radius are not sufficient to define an ideal diffuser. A set of simulations with cylindrical ducts confirmed the theory that a duct optimised for one loading is less than ideal at other loadings.