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Appropriateness of the definition of 'sedentary' in young children : whole-room calorimetry study

Reilly, John J. and Janssen, Xanne and Cliff, Dylan P. and Okely, Anthony D. (2015) Appropriateness of the definition of 'sedentary' in young children : whole-room calorimetry study. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. ISSN 1878-1861

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Abstract

The present study aimed to measure the energy cost of three common sedentary activities in young children to test whether energy expended was consistent with the recent consensus definition of 'sedentary' as 'any behaviour conducted in a sitting or reclining posture and with an energy cost ≤1.5 metabolic equivalents (METs)' (Sedentary Behaviour Research Network, 2012).  This was an observational study.