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Shock structure formation in dusty plasmas

Popel, S. I. and Golub, A. P. and Losseva, T. V. and Bingham, R. and Benkadda, S. (2001) Shock structure formation in dusty plasmas. Plasma Physics Reports, 27 (6). pp. 455-461. ISSN 1562-6938

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Abstract

The problem of the evolution of a perturbation in a dusty plasma and its transformation into a nonlinear wave structure is considered. A computational method that allows one to solve the set of nonlinear evolutionary equations describing variable-charge dust grains, Boltzmann electrons, and inertial ions is developed. Exact steady-state solutions corresponding to ion-acoustic shock structures associated with anomalous dissipation originating from dust grain charging are found taking into account the effect of electron and ion charge separation. The role of this effect increases with the speed of the shock. The evolutions of an initial soliton (which is a steady-state wave solution in a plasma containing dust grains with a constant charge) and an initially immobile perturbation with a constant increased ion density are investigated. In a charge-varying dusty plasma, the soliton evolves into a nonsteady shock wave structure that propagates at a constant speed and whose amplitude decreases with time. The initially immobile perturbation with a constant increased ion density evolves into a shock structure similar to a steady-state shock wave. In the latter case, the compression shock wave is accompanied by a rarefaction region (dilatation wave), which finally leads to the destruction of the shock structure. The solution of the problem of the evolution of a perturbation and its transformation into a shock wave in a charge-varying dusty plasma opens up the possibility of describing real phenomena (such as supernova explosions) and laboratory and active space experiments.