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Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the School of Education, including those researching educational and social practices in curricular subjects. Research in this area seeks to understand the complex influences that increase curricula capacity and engagement by studying how curriculum practices relate to cultural, intellectual and social practices in and out of schools and nurseries.

Research at the School of Education also spans a number of other areas, including inclusive pedagogy, philosophy of education, health and wellbeing within health-related aspects of education (e.g. physical education and sport pedagogy, autism and technology, counselling education, and pedagogies for mental and emotional health), languages education, and other areas.

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Spectral conversion of InGaN ultraviolet microarray light-emitting diodes using fluorene-based red-, green-, blue-, and white-light emitting polymer overlayer films

Heliotis, G. and Stavrinou, P.N. and Bradley, D.D.C. and Gu, E. and Griffin, C. and Jeon, C.W. and Dawson, M.D. (2005) Spectral conversion of InGaN ultraviolet microarray light-emitting diodes using fluorene-based red-, green-, blue-, and white-light emitting polymer overlayer films. Applied Physics Letters, 87 (103505). ISSN 0003-6951

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Abstract

We report the fabrication of hybrid organic/inorganic semiconductor light-emitting devices that operate across the entire visible spectrum. The devices are based on a series of blue-, green-, and red-light-emitting polyfluorene materials that convert the emission from an array of micron-sized ultraviolet InGaN light-emitting diodes. We also demonstrate white-light-emitting versions of these hybrid devices by employing single films of carefully adjusted polyfluorene blends in which cascade energy transfer occurs between the constituent materials. The spectral and operating characteristics of the devices are described in detail. Such organic emission layer/inorganic light-emitting diode (LED) array based devices may provide a promising route to the fabrication of low-cost full-color microdisplays and other instrumentation devices.