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Literary linguistics: Open Access research in English language

Strathprints makes available Open Access scholarly outputs by English Studies at Strathclyde. Particular research specialisms include literary linguistics, the study of literary texts using techniques drawn from linguistics and cognitive science.

The team also demonstrates research expertise in Renaissance studies, researching Renaissance literature, the history of ideas and language and cultural history. English hosts the Centre for Literature, Culture & Place which explores literature and its relationships with geography, space, landscape, travel, architecture, and the environment.

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Spectral conversion of InGaN ultraviolet microarray light-emitting diodes using fluorene-based red-, green-, blue-, and white-light emitting polymer overlayer films

Heliotis, G. and Stavrinou, P.N. and Bradley, D.D.C. and Gu, E. and Griffin, C. and Jeon, C.W. and Dawson, M.D. (2005) Spectral conversion of InGaN ultraviolet microarray light-emitting diodes using fluorene-based red-, green-, blue-, and white-light emitting polymer overlayer films. Applied Physics Letters, 87 (103505). ISSN 0003-6951

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Abstract

We report the fabrication of hybrid organic/inorganic semiconductor light-emitting devices that operate across the entire visible spectrum. The devices are based on a series of blue-, green-, and red-light-emitting polyfluorene materials that convert the emission from an array of micron-sized ultraviolet InGaN light-emitting diodes. We also demonstrate white-light-emitting versions of these hybrid devices by employing single films of carefully adjusted polyfluorene blends in which cascade energy transfer occurs between the constituent materials. The spectral and operating characteristics of the devices are described in detail. Such organic emission layer/inorganic light-emitting diode (LED) array based devices may provide a promising route to the fabrication of low-cost full-color microdisplays and other instrumentation devices.