Picture of boy being examining by doctor at a tuberculosis sanatorium

Understanding our future through Open Access research about our past...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Centre for the Social History of Health & Healthcare (CSHHH), based within the School of Humanities, and considered Scotland's leading centre for the history of health and medicine.

Research at CSHHH explores the modern world since 1800 in locations as diverse as the UK, Asia, Africa, North America, and Europe. Areas of specialism include contraception and sexuality; family health and medical services; occupational health and medicine; disability; the history of psychiatry; conflict and warfare; and, drugs, pharmaceuticals and intoxicants.

Explore the Open Access research of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Image: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Wellcome Collection - CC-BY.

Active-matrix GaN micro light-emitting diode display with unprecedented brightness

Herrnsdorf, Johannes and McKendry, Jonathan J. D. and Zhang, Shuailong and Xie, Enyuan and Ferreira, Ricardo and Massoubre, David and Zuhdi, Ahmad Mahmood and Henderson, Robert K. and Underwood, Ian and Watson, Scott and Kelly, Anthony E. and Gu, Erdan and Dawson, Martin D. (2015) Active-matrix GaN micro light-emitting diode display with unprecedented brightness. IEEE Transactions on Electron Devices, 62 (6). pp. 1918-1925. ISSN 0018-9383

[img]
Preview
Text (Herrnsdorf-etal-TED2015-Active-matrix-GaN-micro-light-emitting-diode)
Herrnsdorf_etal_TED2015_Active_matrix_GaN_micro_light_emitting_diode.pdf
Final Published Version
License: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 logo

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Displays based on microsized gallium nitride light-emitting diodes possess extraordinary brightness. It is demonstrated here both theoretically and experimentally that the layout of the n-contact in these devices is important for the best device performance. We highlight, in particular, the significance of a nonthermal increase of differential resistance upon multipixel operation. These findings underpin the realization of a blue microdisplay with a luminance of 10⁶ cd/m².