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Analysis of particle charging mechanism for optimisation of precipitation efficiency

Timoshkin, Igor V. and Mermigkas, Athanasios C. and MacGregor, Scott J. and Given, Martin J and Wilson, Mark P. and Wang, Tao (2012) Analysis of particle charging mechanism for optimisation of precipitation efficiency. In: Proceedings of the 2012 IEEE International Power Modulator and High Voltage Conference. IEEE, Piscataway, NJ., pp. 114-117. ISBN 9781467312226

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Abstract

The present paper analyses the space charge influenced electric field in a coaxial electrostatic precipitation reactor and discusses the charging process of particles in an impulsive electric field. An analytical expression for the transient non-compensated charge on the particle surface has been obtained. It has been shown that this charge depends of the dielectric properties of the external medium and the particle. The efficiency of micro-electrostatic precipitation process (μ-ESP) in which a combination of DC voltage and high voltage impulses is used to energise the double stage precipitation reactor has been evaluated. It has been shown that this μ-ESP process can provide high removal efficiency for particles as small as 250 nm.