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Driving innovations in manufacturing: Open Access research from DMEM

Strathprints makes available Open Access scholarly outputs by Strathclyde's Department of Design, Manufacture & Engineering Management (DMEM).

Centred on the vision of 'Delivering Total Engineering', DMEM is a centre for excellence in the processes, systems and technologies needed to support and enable engineering from concept to remanufacture. From user-centred design to sustainable design, from manufacturing operations to remanufacturing, from advanced materials research to systems engineering.

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Assessing the evidence base on health, employability and the labour market : lessons for activation in the UK

Lindsay, Colin and Greve, Bent and Cabras, Ignazio and Ellison, Nick and Kellett, Steve (2015) Assessing the evidence base on health, employability and the labour market : lessons for activation in the UK. Social Policy and Administration, 49 (2). pp. 143-160. ISSN 0144-5596

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Abstract

This article draws on the research of authors participating in this Special Issue, as well as a broader evidence review on how health, disability, labour market inequalities and other factors contribute to high levels of disability benefit (DB) claiming among certain communities. We argue that the evidence points to a complex combination of factors feeding into high levels of DB claiming in the UK and beyond, namely: geographical concentrations of health problems and disability-related barriers; gaps in employability and skills; and labour market inequalities that limit the quantity and quality of work opportunities in some regions. The article then provides a comparative, critical commentary on the evolution of activation and welfare reform policies in the UK and (briefly) Denmark – a welfare state that has experienced similarly high levels of DB claiming, but has adopted very different policy responses. Specifically, we discuss the extent to which emerging active labour market policies, occupational health services and changes to the benefit system reflect the evidence on the nature of the barriers faced by people on DBs. The article concludes by identifying recommendations for health, employment and labour market policies.