Picture map of Europe with pins indicating European capital cities

Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

Explore research outputs by the European Policies Research Centre...

Evaluation of Jensen-Shannon distance over sparse data

Connor, Richard and Cardillo, Franco Alberto and Moss, Robert and Rabitti, Fausto (2013) Evaluation of Jensen-Shannon distance over sparse data. In: Similarity Search and Applications. Lecture Notes in Computer Science . Springer, Berlin, pp. 163-168. ISBN 9783642410611

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

Jensen-Shannon divergence is a symmetrised, smoothed version of Küllback-Leibler. It has been shown to be the square of a proper distance metric, and has other properties which make it an excellent choice for many high-dimensional spaces in R*. The metric as defined is however expensive to evaluate. In sparse spaces over many dimensions the Intrinsic Dimensionality of the metric space is typically very high, making similarity-based indexing ineffectual. Exhaustive searching over large data collections may be infeasible. Using a property that allows the distance to be evaluated from only those dimensions which are non-zero in both arguments, and through the identification of a threshold function, we show that the cost of the function can be dramatically reduced.