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A novel fabrication method for a 64x64 matrix-addressable GaN-based micro-LED array

Jeon, C.W. and Choi, H.W. and Dawson, M.D. (2003) A novel fabrication method for a 64x64 matrix-addressable GaN-based micro-LED array. Physica Status Solidi A, 200 (1). pp. 79-82. ISSN 1862-6300

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Abstract

The fabrication and performance of GaN-based micro-light emitting diode (-LED) arrays with 64 × 64 elements is reported. The diameter of each element is 20 m and center-to-center spacing 30 m, giving an overall active area of the arrays of 80425 m2. Through a novel fabrication approach including a isotropic dry etching and a self-aligned isolation technique, we could easily obtain an interconnection for a matrix-addressable array device. The arrays emit >50 W per element at 3 mA drive current. Adopting a spreading metal as a p-contact, the turn-on voltage was lowered down to 3.4 V.