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Effect of wind turbine wakes on wind-induced motions in wood-pole overhead lines

MacIver, C. and Cruden, A. and Leithead, W. E. and Bertinet, M. P. (2015) Effect of wind turbine wakes on wind-induced motions in wood-pole overhead lines. Wind Energy, 18 (4). pp. 643-662. ISSN 1095-4244

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Abstract

Wood-pole overhead conductor lines are known to be subject to different wind induced motions, some which lead to conductor fatigue over long periods and others that can cause severe damage over short, isolated incidences. These lines are often located in rural areas and, with the ever increasing deployment of onshore wind farms, the potential impact of the wind turbine wakes on these conductor motions is a matter of interest. Discussion of the potential effects of conductor fatigue on wood-pole overhead conductor lines is important as this could impact the planning, modelling and siting of onshore wind farms. This paper presents a literature analysis of both the mechanism by which different conductor motions are excited and wind turbine wake characteristics with specific interest at low levels akin to wood-pole height. The archival value of this paper is that experimental data from an active wind farm, at wood-pole overhead line heights, is analysed and discussed for the first time and the results show that wake effects at these heights are likely to be minimal. However turbulent buffeting in particular is cited as a problem of interest and the potential effects of wood-pole motions are outlined.