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Where technology & law meet: Open Access research on data security & its regulation ...

Strathprints makes available Open Access scholarly outputs exploring both the technical aspects of computer security, but also the regulation of existing or emerging technologies. A research specialism of the Department of Computer & Information Sciences (CIS) is computer security. Researchers explore issues surrounding web intrusion detection techniques, malware characteristics, textual steganography and trusted systems. Digital forensics and cyber crime are also a focus.

Meanwhile, the School of Law and its Centre for Internet Law & Policy undertake studies on Internet governance. An important component of this work is consideration of privacy and data protection questions and the increasing focus on cybercrime and 'cyberterrorism'.

Explore the Open Access research by CIS on computer security or the School of Law's work on law, technology and regulation. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Luminescence properties of metallopolymer-gold nanoparticle composites

Forster, Robert J. and Dennany, Lynn and Seery, Michael and Keyes, Tia E. (2005) Luminescence properties of metallopolymer-gold nanoparticle composites. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, 5825. pp. 609-614. ISSN 0277-786X

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Abstract

Thin films of the metallopolymer [Os(bpy)2 (PVP)10] 2+, where bpy is 2,21-dipyridyl and PVP is poly(4-vinylpyridine), luminesce at 750±12 nm upon excitation at 355nm. The luminescence decay responses can be described by a double exponential decay model in which the limiting lifetimes are 75±14 (population fraction of 0.9) and 35±8 ns (population fraction of 0.1) for films in contact with aqueous 0.1 M H2SO4- Electrochemistry has been used to create well defined concentrations of the luminescence quencher, Os 3+, within the films. Time resolved spectroscopy reveals that both dynamic and static processes contribute to luminescence quenching with a rate constant for electron transfer between the photoexcited Os2+* and the Os3+ centres of 1.3×107 M-1s -1 being observed. Stable gold nanoparticles have been created within the metal lopolymer by the chemical reduction of tetrachloroaurate. These nanocomposite materials exhibit enhanced emission intensity compared to the gold free films.