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Literary linguistics: Open Access research in English language

Strathprints makes available Open Access scholarly outputs by English Studies at Strathclyde. Particular research specialisms include literary linguistics, the study of literary texts using techniques drawn from linguistics and cognitive science.

The team also demonstrates research expertise in Renaissance studies, researching Renaissance literature, the history of ideas and language and cultural history. English hosts the Centre for Literature, Culture & Place which explores literature and its relationships with geography, space, landscape, travel, architecture, and the environment.

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Upper limb movement analysis via marker tracking with a single-camera system

Yang, Cheng and Kerr, Andy and Stankovic, Vladimir and Stankovic, Lina and Rowe, Philip (2014) Upper limb movement analysis via marker tracking with a single-camera system. In: 2014 IEEE International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP). IEEE, 2285 - 2289. ISBN 9781479957514

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Abstract

Optical motion capture systems have been widely adopted for human motion analysis in stroke rehabilitation because of real-time processing and high-accuracy features. However, these systems require a large laboratory space and multiple cameras and thus can be expensive and not transportable. In this paper, we propose a portable, cheap, single-camera motion analysis system to implement upper limb movement analysis. The proposed system consists of video acquisition, camera calibration, marker tracking, autonomous joint angle calculation, visualization, validation and classification. The validation with a state-of-the-art optical motion analysis system using Bland-Altman plot, a typical clinical measure, indicates that the proposed system can accurately capture elbow movement, trunk-tilt, and shoulder movement for diagnosis. Furthermore, the volunteers are explicitly classified into healthy and stroke groups via a support vector machine trained on statistics of the trunk-tilt and shoulder movement. Experimental results show that the proposed system can accurately capture the upper limb movement patterns, automatically classify stroke survivors using ordinal scale classification of upper limb impairment, and offer a convenient and inexpensive solution for upper limb movement analysis.