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Performance of air-filled plasma closing switch with corona pre-ionisation

Hogg, Michael and Timoshkin, Igor and MacGregor, Scott and Given, Martin and Wilson, Mark and Wang, Tao (2012) Performance of air-filled plasma closing switch with corona pre-ionisation. In: XIX International Conference on Gas Discharges and their Applications. UNSPECIFIED, pp. 504-507.

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Abstract

Gas-filled plasma closing switches are widely used in pulsed power technology for generation of short high voltage impulses. There is a growing tendency to use environmentally friendly gases such as air, oxygen, nitrogen or their mixtures in such devices instead of the traditional insulating gaseous switching medium, sulphur hexafluoride, due to its high cost and the environmental issues associated with this gas. The present study is focused on the analysis of performance of self-breakdown plasma closing switch with corona pre-ionisation electrodes. The following aspects of switch performance have been investigated: the self-breakdown voltage and its spread. This paper presents evidence that the use of a pre-ionisation electrode can reduce the voltage spread.