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The development and validation of an augmented video based portable system

Ugbolue, Ukadike and Papi, Enrica and Kaliarntas, Konstantinos and Kerr, Andy and Rowe, Philip J. (2014) The development and validation of an augmented video based portable system. Gait and Posture, 39 (Suppl ). S43-S44. ISSN 0966-6362

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Abstract

Three dimensional (3D) motion analysis systems have demonstrated clinical acceptance with the incorporation of active (light emitting diodes) marker and passive (retroreflective) marker measurement systems [1]. Despite the high reliability of 3D motion analysis systems, they remain expensive, complex to operate, time consuming, difficult to understand in terms of data interpretation, and often they are beyond the means and capacity of most rehabilitation services. The need has arisen to develop a 2D video system that meets the requirements of accessibility in terms of cost, operability and portability [2] and [3]. Within our laboratory a new augmented video based portable system (AVPS) that uses a low cost simple video technique has been developed. This study reports the concurrent validity of the new AVPS as a potential rehabilitation assessment tool that could be used within the clinical setting.