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Open Access research which pushes advances in bionanotechnology

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SIPBS is a major research centre in Scotland focusing on 'new medicines', 'better medicines' and 'better use of medicines'. This includes the exploration of nanoparticles and nanomedicines within the wider research agenda of bionanotechnology, in which the tools of nanotechnology are applied to solve biological problems. At SIPBS multidisciplinary approaches are also pursued to improve bioscience understanding of novel therapeutic targets with the aim of developing therapeutic interventions and the investigation, development and manufacture of drug substances and products.

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Impact of C2C Operation on DG Capacity in HV Networks

Blair, Steven Macpherson and Booth, Campbell (2014) Impact of C2C Operation on DG Capacity in HV Networks. Working paper. University of Strathclyde.

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    Abstract

    The objective of the Capacity to Customers (C2C) project, an Ofgem Low Carbon Network Fund project led by Electricity North West Limited (ENWL) in conjunction with several industrial and academic partners, is to test a combination of new automation technology, non-conventional network operational practices (i.e., increased network interconnection), and commercial demand-side response (DSR) contracts. These changes will allow ENWL to increase demand and generation connections on a selection of trial circuits – representing approximately 10% of its high voltage (HV) system – without resorting to conventional reinforcement measures. The project will thereby “release” inherent spare capacity in the HV system in order to accommodate the future forecast increases in demand and DG, whilst avoiding (or deferring) the cost and environmental impacts that are associated with traditional network reinforcement. This paper documents work undertaken by the University of Strathclyde to quantify the ability of C2C network operation to accommodate additional DG capacity. This has been achieved using simulation models based upon actual system data from a representative proportion of the C2C trial circuits.