Picture of boy being examining by doctor at a tuberculosis sanatorium

Understanding our future through Open Access research about our past...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Centre for the Social History of Health & Healthcare (CSHHH), based within the School of Humanities, and considered Scotland's leading centre for the history of health and medicine.

Research at CSHHH explores the modern world since 1800 in locations as diverse as the UK, Asia, Africa, North America, and Europe. Areas of specialism include contraception and sexuality; family health and medical services; occupational health and medicine; disability; the history of psychiatry; conflict and warfare; and, drugs, pharmaceuticals and intoxicants.

Explore the Open Access research of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Image: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Wellcome Collection - CC-BY.

Backward wave cyclotron-maser emission in the auroral magnetosphere

Speirs, D. C. and Bingham, R. and Cairns, R. A. and Vorgul, I. and Kellett, B. J. and Phelps, A. D R and Ronald, K. (2014) Backward wave cyclotron-maser emission in the auroral magnetosphere. Physical Review Letters, 113 (15). ISSN 0031-9007

[img] PDF (LK14393-manuscript-updated-DCS)
LK14393_manuscript_updated_DCS.pdf
Accepted Author Manuscript
License: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 logo

Download (1MB)

Abstract

In this Letter, we present theory and particle-in-cell simulations describing cyclotron radio emission from Earth's auroral region and similar phenomena in other astrophysical environments. In particular, we find that the radiation, generated by a down-going electron horseshoe distribution is due to a backward-wave cyclotron-maser emission process. The backward wave nature of the radiation contributes to upward refraction of the radiation that is also enhanced by a density inhomogeneity. We also show that the radiation is preferentially amplified along the auroral oval rather than transversely. The results are in agreement with recent Cluster observations.