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Improved protocols for vibrational spectroscopic analysis of body fluids

Bonnier, Franck and Petitjean, François and Baker, Matthew J. and Byrne, Hugh J. (2014) Improved protocols for vibrational spectroscopic analysis of body fluids. Journal of Biophotonics, 7 (3-4). pp. 167-179. ISSN 1864-063X

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Abstract

The applications of vibrational spectroscopy to the examination of human blood serum are explored. Although FTIR spectra can be recorded in aqueous solutions at (gelatin) concentrations as low as 100 mg/L, the high-wavenumber region remains obscured by water absorption. Using Raman spectroscopy, high quality spectra of gelatine solutions as low as 10 mg/L can be achieved, also covering the high-wavenumber regions. In human serum, spectral profiles are weak and partially obscured by water features. Dried deposits are shown to be physically and chemically inhomogeneous resulting in reduced measurement reproducibility. Concentration of the serum using commercially available centrifugal filter devices results in an improvement in the spectral intensity and quality. Additionally, in Raman spectroscopy, reduced background and significantly enhanced signal collection is achievable by measurement in an inverted geometry. The improved protocols for spectroscopic measurement of human serum are applicable to a range of bodily fluids and should accelerate potential clinical applications.