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Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

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A high-speed bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy system based on the digital auto-balancing bridge method

Li, Nan and Xu, Hui and Wang, Wei and Zhou, Zhou and Qiao, Guofeng and Li, David D U (2013) A high-speed bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy system based on the digital auto-balancing bridge method. Measurement Science and Technology, 24 (6). ISSN 0957-0233

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Abstract

A novel bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy system based on the digital auto-balancing bridge method improved from the conventional analogue auto-balancing method is presented for bioelectrical impedance measurements. The hardware of the proposed system consists of a reference source, a null detector, a variable source, a field programmable gate array, a clock generator, a flash and a USB controller. Software implemented in the field programmable gate array includes three major blocks: clock management, peripheral control and digital signal processing. The principle and realization of the least-mean-squares-based digital auto-balancing algorithm is introduced in detail. The performances of our system were examined by comparing with a commercial impedance analyzer. The results reveal that the proposed system has high speed (less than 3.5 ms per measurement) and high accuracy in the frequency range of 1 kHz-10 MHz. Compared with the commercial instrument based on the traditional analogue auto-balancing method, our system shows advantages in measurement speed, compactness and flexibility, making it suitable for various bioelectrical impedance measurement applications.