Picture water droplets

Developing mathematical theories of the physical world: Open Access research on fluid dynamics from Strathclyde

Strathprints makes available Open Access scholarly outputs by Strathclyde's Department of Mathematics & Statistics, where continuum mechanics and industrial mathematics is a specialism. Such research seeks to understand fluid dynamics, among many other related areas such as liquid crystals and droplet evaporation.

The Department of Mathematics & Statistics also demonstrates expertise in population modelling & epidemiology, stochastic analysis, applied analysis and scientific computing. Access world leading mathematical and statistical Open Access research!

Explore all Strathclyde Open Access research...

A simple technique to determine the anisotropy of Young's modulus of single crystal silicon using coupled micro-cantilevers

Boyd, Euan James and Choubey, Bhaskar and Armstrong, Ian and Uttamchandani, Deepak G. (2012) A simple technique to determine the anisotropy of Young's modulus of single crystal silicon using coupled micro-cantilevers. In: IEEE 25th International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), 2012. Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) . IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, United States, pp. 389-391. ISBN 9781467303248

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

This paper reports on a simple technique to measure the anisotropy of the Young's modulus of single crystal silicon using a coupled cantilever structure fabricated in the silicon. We demonstrate that it is possible to determine the Young's modulus of five silicon micro-cantilevers, whose orientations range from 30Υ to 55Υ to the wafer flat, by measuring the resonance frequencies of just one single cantilever of the coupled structure in a " perturbed" and "unperturbed" state. In this work the perturbation of the coupled system was achieved by shortening one of the cantilevers using focused ion beam milling. The resulting Young's modulus values from this experiment agree very well with the theoretical values with a difference of less than 2.5%.