Picture of rolled up £5 note

Open Access research that shapes economic thinking...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by the Fraser of Allander Institute (FAI), a leading independent economic research unit focused on the Scottish economy and based within the Department of Economics. The FAI focuses on research exploring economics and its role within sustainable growth policy, fiscal analysis, energy and climate change, labour market trends, inclusive growth and wellbeing.

The open content by FAI made available by Strathprints also includes an archive of over 40 years of papers and commentaries published in the Fraser of Allander Economic Commentary, formerly known as the Quarterly Economic Commentary. Founded in 1975, "the Commentary" is the leading publication on the Scottish economy and offers authoritative and independent analysis of the key issues of the day.

Explore Open Access research by FAI or the Department of Economics - or read papers from the Commentary archive [1975-2006] and [2007-2018]. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Spontaneous parametric fluorescence in SOI integrated micoresonators

Azzini, Stefano and Grassani, Davide and Liscidini, Marco and Galli, Matteo and Gerace, Dario and Sorel, Marc and Strain, Michael John and Velha, Philippe and Bajoni, Daniele (2013) Spontaneous parametric fluorescence in SOI integrated micoresonators. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, 8915. ISSN 0277-786X

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

Four-wave mixing can be stimulated or occur spontaneously: the latter effect, also known as parametric fluorescence, can be explained only in the framework of a quantum theory of light, and it is at the basis of many protocols to generate nonclassical states of the electromagnetic field. In this work we report on our experimental study of spontaneous four wave mixing in microring resonators and photonic crystal molecules integrated on a silicon on insulator platform. We find that both structures are able to generate signal and idler beams in the telecom band, at rates of millions of photons per second, under sub-mW pumping. By comparing the experiments on the two structures we find that the photonic molecule is an order of magnitude more efficient than the ring resonator, due to the reduced mode volume of the individual resonators.