Picture of DNA strand

Pioneering chemical biology & medicinal chemistry through Open Access research...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Department of Pure & Applied Chemistry, based within the Faculty of Science.

Research here spans a wide range of topics from analytical chemistry to materials science, and from biological chemistry to theoretical chemistry. The specific work in chemical biology and medicinal chemistry, as an example, encompasses pioneering techniques in synthesis, bioinformatics, nucleic acid chemistry, amino acid chemistry, heterocyclic chemistry, biophysical chemistry and NMR spectroscopy.

Explore the Open Access research of the Department of Pure & Applied Chemistry. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Effects of cobalt addition on structural, thermal and electrical properties of praseodymium-yttrium co-doped barium cerates

Petit, Christophe T G and Tao, Shanwen (2014) Effects of cobalt addition on structural, thermal and electrical properties of praseodymium-yttrium co-doped barium cerates. Journal of Electroceramics. ISSN 1385-3449 (In Press)

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

Effects of cobalt addition on structural, thermal and electrical properties of praseodymium-yttrium co-doped barium cerates have been investigated. Relative densities >98 % have been achieved after sintering at 1400 °C or 1500 °C for only 1 h. All studied compounds are stable in ambient air up to the measured 900 °C and, in reducing atmosphere (both wet and dry 5 % H2-Ar) up to the measured 800 °C. The Co-free sample (BaCe0.7Y0.2Pr0.1O3-δ) exhibits the highest conductivity of 1.21 × 10-2 S cm-1 at 700 °C in air while the corresponding cobalt containing sample (BaCe0.7Y0.175Pr0.1Co0.025O3-δ) has a conductivity of 9.85 × 10-3 S cm-1 at 700 °C in air. Cobalt addition allows the ability to retain much larger amounts of water to be retained as suggested by the higher conductivities obtained in wet hydrogen compared to the values in dry reducing atmosphere. This latter phenomenon is of special interest as it suggests the possibility of higher ionic conductivities in water-containing atmosphere and would benefit to intermediate- and high-temperature solid oxide fuel cells and/or electrolysers. The thermal expansion coefficients for the Co-free and Co-containing samples were around 12.0 × 10-6 K-1 between 25 and 1000 °C.