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A 3Gb/s single-LED OFDM-based wireless VLC link using a gallium nitride µLED

Tsonev, Dobroslav and Chun, Hyunchae and Rajbhandari, Sujan and McKendry, Jonathan and Videv, Stefan and Gu, Erdan and Haji, Mohsin and Watson, Scott and Kelly, Anthony and Faulkner, Graheme and Dawson, Martin and Haas, Harald and O'Brien, Dominic (2014) A 3Gb/s single-LED OFDM-based wireless VLC link using a gallium nitride µLED. IEEE Photonics Technology Letters, 26 (7). pp. 637-640. ISSN 1041-1135

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Abstract

This letter presents a visible light communication (VLC) system based on a single 50-µm gallium nitride light emitting diode (LED). A device of this size exhibits a 3-dB modulation bandwidth of at least 60 MHz—significantly higher than commercially available white lighting LEDs. Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing is employed as a modulation scheme. This enables the limited modulation bandwidth of the device to be fully used. Pre- and postequalization techniques, as well as adaptive data loading, are successfully applied to achieve a demonstration of wireless communication at speeds exceeding 3 Gb/s. To date, this is the fastest wireless VLC system using a single LED. Index