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Gestural product interaction : development and evaluation of an emotional vocabulary

Wodehouse, Andrew and Marks, Jonathon (2013) Gestural product interaction : development and evaluation of an emotional vocabulary. International Journal of Art, Culture and Design Technologies, 3 (2). pp. 1-13.

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Abstract

This research explores emotional response to gesture in order to inform future product interaction design. After describing the emergence and likely role of full-body interfaces with devices and systems, the importance of emotional reaction to the necessary movements and gestures is outlined. A gestural vocabulary for the control of a web page is then presented, along with a semantic differential questionnaire for its evaluation. An experiment is described where users undertook a series of web navigation tasks using the gestural vocabulary, then recorded their reaction to the experience. A number of insights were drawn on the context, precision, distinction, repetition and scale of gestures when used to control or activate a product. These insights will be of help in interaction design, and provide a basis for further development of the gestural vocabulary.