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Open Access research which pushes advances in bionanotechnology

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy & Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS) , based within the Faculty of Science.

SIPBS is a major research centre in Scotland focusing on 'new medicines', 'better medicines' and 'better use of medicines'. This includes the exploration of nanoparticles and nanomedicines within the wider research agenda of bionanotechnology, in which the tools of nanotechnology are applied to solve biological problems. At SIPBS multidisciplinary approaches are also pursued to improve bioscience understanding of novel therapeutic targets with the aim of developing therapeutic interventions and the investigation, development and manufacture of drug substances and products.

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The impact of community-based physical activity projects on girls' and young women's engagement in physical activity : findings from an evaluation of the 'Girls on the Move' programme

Taylor, J. and Hughes, A. and Koufaki, P. (2013) The impact of community-based physical activity projects on girls' and young women's engagement in physical activity : findings from an evaluation of the 'Girls on the Move' programme. Managing Leisure, 18 (1). pp. 46-60. ISSN 1360-6719

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Abstract

Using findings of an evaluation of the 'Girls on the Move' programme in Scotland, this article assesses the short-term (up to 6 months) impact that community-based projects can have on girls' engagement in physical activity. Attendance, drop out, frequency, duration and intensity of participation in physical activity are considered. The findings indicate that around six-out-of-ten girls maintained their involvement in the projects and that four-out-of-ten girls had high levels of attendance. Although the amount of time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was low (average of 10 min per hour of activity), the findings suggest that girls' activity increased between the beginning and end of projects but remained below healthy reference values. While short-term community-based projects can contribute to daily activity, organised activity sessions need to be supplemented with other forms of physical activity (e.g. physical education, active living) if girls are to attain the recommended 60 min of MVPA per day.