Picture of DNA strand

Pioneering chemical biology & medicinal chemistry through Open Access research...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Department of Pure & Applied Chemistry, based within the Faculty of Science.

Research here spans a wide range of topics from analytical chemistry to materials science, and from biological chemistry to theoretical chemistry. The specific work in chemical biology and medicinal chemistry, as an example, encompasses pioneering techniques in synthesis, bioinformatics, nucleic acid chemistry, amino acid chemistry, heterocyclic chemistry, biophysical chemistry and NMR spectroscopy.

Explore the Open Access research of the Department of Pure & Applied Chemistry. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Nanoscale-accuracy transfer printing of ultra-thin AlInGaN light-emitting diodes onto mechanically flexible substrates

Trindade, Antonio Jose Marques and Guilhabert, Benoit Jack Eloi and Massoubre, David and Zhu, Dandan and Laurand, Nicolas and Gu, Erdan and Watson, Ian and Humphreys, Colin J and Dawson, Martin (2013) Nanoscale-accuracy transfer printing of ultra-thin AlInGaN light-emitting diodes onto mechanically flexible substrates. Applied Physics Letters, 103 (25). ISSN 0003-6951

Full text not available in this repository.Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

The transfer printing of 2 μm-thick aluminum indium gallium nitride (AlInGaN) micron-size light-emitting diodes with 150 nm (±14 nm) minimum spacing is reported. The thin AlInGaN structures were assembled onto mechanically flexible polyethyleneterephthalate/polydimethylsiloxane substrates in a representative 16 × 16 array format using a modified dip-pen nano-patterning system. Devices in the array were positioned using a pre-calculated set of coordinates to demonstrate an automated transfer printing process. Individual printed array elements showed blue emission centered at 486 nm with a forward-directed optical output power up to 80 μW (355 mW/cm2) when operated at a current density of 20 A/cm2.