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Potential impact of uncoordinated domestic plug-in electric vehicle charging demand on power distribution networks

Huang, Sikai and Carter, Rebecca and Cruden, Andrew and Densley, David and Nicklin, Tim and Infield, David (2012) Potential impact of uncoordinated domestic plug-in electric vehicle charging demand on power distribution networks. In: EEVC-2012 European Electric Vehicle Congress, 2012-11-19 - 2012-11-22.

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Abstract

Electric vehicle (EV) user trials have been performed by a major UK electricity utility in cooperation with an automobile manufacture in order to determine the impact of domestic user charging on the regional power distribution system. Charging facilities are made available within the users’ homes; delay timers are included and a dual electricity tariff is offered. User charging behaviour must be seen in the context of the wider household activity and has a significant influence on the EV charging demand. Unconstrained charging behaviours have been examined for two types of EV and two different associated charge rates. LV network models have been constructed in OpenDSS to assist in the determination of potential future impacts of EV charging demand. This paper presents the key finds of the LV network impact analysis, including peak power demand and voltage deviation.