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Multiscale simulation of nanometric cutting of single crystal copper and its experimental validation

Pen, Hongmin and Liang, Yingchun and Luo, Xichun and Bai, Qingshun and goel, Saurav and Ritchie, James (2011) Multiscale simulation of nanometric cutting of single crystal copper and its experimental validation. Computational Materials Science, 50 (12). pp. 3431-3441. ISSN 0927-0256

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Abstract

In this paper a multiscale simulation study was carried out in order to gain in-depth understanding of machining mechanism of nanometric cutting of single crystal copper. This study was focused on the effects of crystal orientation and cutting direction on the attainable machined surface quality. The machining mechanics was analyzed through cutting forces, chip formation morphology, generation and evolution of defects and residual stresses on the machined surface. The simulation results showed that the crystal orientation of the copper material and the cutting direction significantly influenced the deformation mechanism of the workpiece materials during the machining process. Relatively lower cutting forces were experienced while selecting crystal orientation family {1 1 1}. Dislocation movements were found to concentrate in front of the cutting chip while cutting on the (1 1 1) surface along the ½110 cutting direction thus, resulting in much smaller damaged layer on the machined surface, compared to other orientations. This crystal orientation and cutting direction therefore recommended for nanometric cutting of single crystal copper in practical applications. A nano-scratching experiment was performed to validate the above findings.