Picture of boy being examining by doctor at a tuberculosis sanatorium

Understanding our future through Open Access research about our past...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Centre for the Social History of Health & Healthcare (CSHHH), based within the School of Humanities, and considered Scotland's leading centre for the history of health and medicine.

Research at CSHHH explores the modern world since 1800 in locations as diverse as the UK, Asia, Africa, North America, and Europe. Areas of specialism include contraception and sexuality; family health and medical services; occupational health and medicine; disability; the history of psychiatry; conflict and warfare; and, drugs, pharmaceuticals and intoxicants.

Explore the Open Access research of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Image: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Wellcome Collection - CC-BY.

A quantitative assessment of nanometric machinability of major polytypes of single crystal silicon carbide

Luo, Xichun and Goel, Saurav and Reuben, Robert L (2012) A quantitative assessment of nanometric machinability of major polytypes of single crystal silicon carbide. Journal of the European Ceramic Society, 32 (12). pp. 3423-3434. ISSN 0955-2219

[img]
Preview
PDF
SiC_paper.pdf
Preprint

Download (4MB) | Preview

Abstract

The influence of polymorphism on nanometric machinability of single crystal silicon carbide (SiC) has been investigated through molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The simulation results are compared with silicon as a reference material. Cutting hardness was adopted as a quantifier of the machinability of the polytypes of single crystal SiC. 3C-SiC offered highest cutting resistance (∼2.9 times that of silicon) followed by the 4H-SiC (∼2.8 times that of silicon) whereas 6H-SiC (∼2.1 times that of silicon) showed the least. Despite its high cutting resistance, 4H-SiC showed the minimum sub-surface crystal lattice deformed layer depth, in contrast to 6H-SiC. Further analysis of temperatures in the cutting zone and the percentage tool wear indicated that single point diamond turning (SPDT) of single crystal SiC could be limited to either 6H-SiC or 4H-SiC depending upon quality and cost considerations as these were found to be more responsive and amenable to SPDT compared to single crystal 3C-SiC.