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Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

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Minimum cost solution of photovoltaic-diesel-battery hybrid power systems for remote consumers

Tazvinga, Henerica and Xia, Xiaohua and Zhang, Jiangfeng (2013) Minimum cost solution of photovoltaic-diesel-battery hybrid power systems for remote consumers. Solar Energy, 96 (Octobe). pp. 292-299. ISSN 0038-092X

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Abstract

Hybrid systems present a new dimension to the time correlation of intermittent renewable energy sources. The paper considers the daily energy consumption variations for winter and summer weekdays and weekends in order to compare the corresponding fuel costs and evaluate the operational efficiency of the hybrid system for a 24-h period. Previous studies have assumed a fixed load and uniform daily operational cost. A load following diesel dispatch strategy is employed in this work and the fuel costs and energy flows are analysed. The results show that the photovoltaic–diesel–battery model achieves 73% and 77% fuel savings in winter and 80.5% and 82% fuel savings in summer for days considered when compared to the case where the diesel generator satisfies the load on its own. The fuel costs obtained during both winter and summer seasons for weekdays and weekends show substantial variations which should not be neglected if accurate operation costs are to be achieved. The results indicate that the developed model can achieve a more practical estimate of the fuel costs reflecting variations of power consumption behavior patterns for any given system.