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Harvests of violence : neglect of basic rights and the Boko Haram insurgency in Nigeria

Yusuf, Hakeem (2013) Harvests of violence : neglect of basic rights and the Boko Haram insurgency in Nigeria. Critical Studies on Terrorism, n/a (n/a). pp. 1-21. ISSN 1753-9153

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Abstract

Drawing on core commitments of Critical Terrorism Studies (CTS), and mostly, the ethic of emancipation, this article focuses on the Boko Haram insurgency to investigate recurring violent conflict in Nigeria. It identifies a governance gap not adverted to in the official narrative which has led to gross discontent at the lower levels of the society. The governance gap has created fertile breeding grounds for the recruitment of disillusioned youths who are easily mobilised to violence and lately, insurgency. There are normative and pragmatic reasons to adopt and prioritise social-welfare through the implementation of economic, social and cultural obligations and due process rights as a viable approach to at least reducing the spate of violence in the country. The discussion has relevance for resolving situations of violence and conflict in sub-Sahara Africa in particular and elsewhere in the developing world.