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Where technology & law meet: Open Access research on data security & its regulation ...

Strathprints makes available Open Access scholarly outputs exploring both the technical aspects of computer security, but also the regulation of existing or emerging technologies. A research specialism of the Department of Computer & Information Sciences (CIS) is computer security. Researchers explore issues surrounding web intrusion detection techniques, malware characteristics, textual steganography and trusted systems. Digital forensics and cyber crime are also a focus.

Meanwhile, the School of Law and its Centre for Internet Law & Policy undertake studies on Internet governance. An important component of this work is consideration of privacy and data protection questions and the increasing focus on cybercrime and 'cyberterrorism'.

Explore the Open Access research by CIS on computer security or the School of Law's work on law, technology and regulation. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Highly-sensitive sonogram for assessment of chirp in semiconductor mode-locked lasers

Stolarz, Piotr Michal and Mezosi, Gábor and Strain, Michael John and Bryce, Ann Catrina and Sorel, Marc (2012) Highly-sensitive sonogram for assessment of chirp in semiconductor mode-locked lasers. IEEE Journal of Quantum Electronics, 48 (8). pp. 995-1003. ISSN 0018-9197

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Abstract

We report on the detailed characterization of ultrashort pulses emitted from a 1.5- AlGaInAs/InP semiconductor passively mode-locked laser, operating at a repetition frequency of 35 GHz. Both the temporal and phase profiles of the pulses are retrieved using a sonogram technique that utilizes a highly-sensitive two-photon absorption waveguide detector. The system enables full characterization of pulses with energy as low as 10 fJ and peak power level of 5 mW, which is only inaccessible by a limited number of high-sensitivity measurement approaches. We show that the pulses exhibit a prevailing positive linear chirp across a wide range of biasing conditions. Its high sensitivity to the gain section current proves the dominant contribution of the gain conditions to the group delay characteristics of the emitted pulses.