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Open Access research which pushes advances in bionanotechnology

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SIPBS is a major research centre in Scotland focusing on 'new medicines', 'better medicines' and 'better use of medicines'. This includes the exploration of nanoparticles and nanomedicines within the wider research agenda of bionanotechnology, in which the tools of nanotechnology are applied to solve biological problems. At SIPBS multidisciplinary approaches are also pursued to improve bioscience understanding of novel therapeutic targets with the aim of developing therapeutic interventions and the investigation, development and manufacture of drug substances and products.

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Lipase-catalyzed kinetic resolution on solid-phase via a "capture and release" strategy

Humphrey, C E and Turner, N J and Easson, M A M and Flitsch, S L and Ulijn, R V (2003) Lipase-catalyzed kinetic resolution on solid-phase via a "capture and release" strategy. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 125 (46). pp. 13952-13953. ISSN 0002-7863

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Abstract

The lipase-catalyzed kinetic resolution of (R/S)-3-phenylbutyric acid 2 using solid-supported cyclohexane-1,3-dione (CHD) 6 is described. In each case the predominant enantiomer observed, after cleavage from the resin, was (R)-(−)-3-phenylbutyric acid (R)-2 (ee > 99%) rather than the expected (S)-enantiomer of 2. This observation is in contrast to the fact that Chromobacterium viscosum lipase shows high enantiospecificity for the (S)-enantiomer in the corresponding solution-phase hydrolysis reactions. The (R)-acyl group was subsequently released from the resin by NaOH hydrolysis, and the yield of the reaction could be improved by triple acylation of the resin.