Picture of boy being examining by doctor at a tuberculosis sanatorium

Understanding our future through Open Access research about our past...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Centre for the Social History of Health & Healthcare (CSHHH), based within the School of Humanities, and considered Scotland's leading centre for the history of health and medicine.

Research at CSHHH explores the modern world since 1800 in locations as diverse as the UK, Asia, Africa, North America, and Europe. Areas of specialism include contraception and sexuality; family health and medical services; occupational health and medicine; disability; the history of psychiatry; conflict and warfare; and, drugs, pharmaceuticals and intoxicants.

Explore the Open Access research of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Image: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Wellcome Collection - CC-BY.

A systematic study on the self-assembly behaviour of multi component fmoc-amino acid-poly(oxazoline) systems

Caponi, Pier-Francesco and Ulijn, Rein V. (2012) A systematic study on the self-assembly behaviour of multi component fmoc-amino acid-poly(oxazoline) systems. Polymers, 4 (3). pp. 1399-1415. ISSN 2073-4360

[img]
Preview
Text (Caponi-Ulijn-Polymers-2015-Self-assembly-behaviour-of-multi-component-fmoc-amino-acid-poly-oxazoline-systems)
Caponi_Ulijn_Polymers_2015_Self_assembly_behaviour_of_multi_component_fmoc_amino_acid_poly_oxazoline_systems.pdf
Final Published Version
License: Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 logo

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

We report a systematic study of a modular approach to create multi-component supramolecular nanostructures that can be tailored to be both enzyme and temperature responsive. Using a straightforward synthetic approach we functionalised a thermal responsive polymer, poly(2-isopropyl-2-oxazoline), with fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl-amino acids that drive the self-assembly. Depending on the properties of appended amino acids, these polymers undergo substantial morphological changes in response to the catalytic action of alkaline phosphatase.