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Optical characterization of gold chains and steps on the vicinal Si(557) surface : theory and experiment

Hogan, Conor and McAlinden, Niall and McGilp, John F. (2012) Optical characterization of gold chains and steps on the vicinal Si(557) surface : theory and experiment. Physica Status Solidi B, 249 (6). pp. 1095-1104. ISSN 0370-1972

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Abstract

We present a joint experimental-theoretical study of the reflectance anisotropy of clean and gold-covered Si(557), a vicinal surface of Si(111) upon which gold forms quasi-one-dimensional (1D) chains parallel to the steps. By means of first-principles calculations, we analyse the close relationship between the various surface structural motifs and the optical properties. Good agreement is found between experimental and computed spectra of single-step models of both clean and Au-adsorbed surfaces. Spectral fingerprints of monoatomic gold chains and silicon step edges are identified. The role of spinorbit coupling (SOC) on the surface optical properties is examined, and found to have little effect.