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Where technology & law meet: Open Access research on data security & its regulation ...

Strathprints makes available Open Access scholarly outputs exploring both the technical aspects of computer security, but also the regulation of existing or emerging technologies. A research specialism of the Department of Computer & Information Sciences (CIS) is computer security. Researchers explore issues surrounding web intrusion detection techniques, malware characteristics, textual steganography and trusted systems. Digital forensics and cyber crime are also a focus.

Meanwhile, the School of Law and its Centre for Internet Law & Policy undertake studies on Internet governance. An important component of this work is consideration of privacy and data protection questions and the increasing focus on cybercrime and 'cyberterrorism'.

Explore the Open Access research by CIS on computer security or the School of Law's work on law, technology and regulation. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Mixing medication into foodstuffs : identifying the issues for paediatric nurses

Akram, Gazala and Mullen, Alexander (2014) Mixing medication into foodstuffs : identifying the issues for paediatric nurses. International Journal of Nursing Practice. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Medication is often mixed into soft foods to aid swallowing in children. However, this can alter the physical/chemical properties of the active drug. This study reports on the prevalence of the modification procedure, the nature of foodstuffs routinely used and factors which influence how the procedure is performed by nurses working in the National Health Service in Scotland. Mixed methods were employed encompassing an online self-administered questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. One hundred and eleven nurses participated, of whom 87% had modified medication prior to administration. Fruit juice (diluted and concentrated) and yoghurts were most commonly used. The interviews (i) identified the limitations of the procedure; (ii) explored the decision-making process; and (iii) confirmed the procedure was a last resort. This study intends to address some of the uncertainty surrounding the medicine modification procedure within the paediatric population.