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Research activity at Architecture explores a wide variety of significant research areas within architecture and the built environment. Among these is the better exploitation of innovative construction technologies and ICT to optimise 'total building performance', as well as reduce waste and environmental impact. Sustainable architectural and urban design is an important component of this. To this end, the Cluster for Research in Design and Sustainability (CRiDS) focuses its research energies towards developing resilient responses to the social, environmental and economic challenges associated with urbanism and cities, in both the developed and developing world.

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A techno-economic analysis of tidal energy technology

Johnstone, Cameron and Pratt, D. and Clarke, Joseph and Grant, Andrew (2013) A techno-economic analysis of tidal energy technology. Renewable Energy, 49. pp. 101-106. ISSN 0960-1481

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Abstract

The choice of which type of electrical power generation technology to adopt is driven by a number of factors including: cost of generated electricity; responsiveness of generating plant to demand; security of supply/resource availability; environmental impact; and execution risk. Within these, tidal energy is unique as a renewable technology since it has the capability of providing predictable, firm power contributing to security of supply. This predictability gives tidal energy additional value in a future electricity market. Especially one where stochastic renewable technologies contribute to a sizable component of the power supplied; and where reserve capacity is required to maintain supply during periods of non-availability. In the shorter term, in order for tidal energy to gain commercial acceptance, tidal technologies under development need to produce electricity at a competitive price. This paper examines the drivers influencing electricity pricing; current tidal energy developments, aimed at reducing capital costs; and bench-mark these against offshore wind.