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Thin plate buckling mitigation and reduction challenges for naval ships

Galloway, Alexander and McGhie, W and McPherson, Norman (2013) Thin plate buckling mitigation and reduction challenges for naval ships. Journal of Marine Engineering & Technology, 12 (2). pp. 3-10. ISSN 1476-1548

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    Abstract

    Thin plate buckling or distortion on ship structures is an ongoing issue for shipbuilders. It has been identified that a significant number of factors can be put in place based on prior knowledge and good practice. Additionally, research work aimed at reducing thin plate distortion has been relatively prolific, particularly in the area of simulation modelling. However, the uptake in the research findings by industry has been relatively low. A number of these findings are discussed and their application considered. For any further reductions in thin plate distortion to be generated there is a clear need for better interaction between the research institutes and the industry.