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Maturational differences in physical self-perceptions and the relationship with physical activity in early adolescent girls

Niven, Ailsa and Fawkner, Samantha and Knowles, Ann-Marie and Stephenson, Claire (2007) Maturational differences in physical self-perceptions and the relationship with physical activity in early adolescent girls. Pediatric Exercise Science, 19 (4). pp. 472-480. ISSN 0899-8493

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Abstract

This cross-sectional study examined the effect of physical self-perceptions and maturation on physical activity, and considered the influence of maturation and age on physical self-perceptions in early adolescent girls (n = 208; mean age = 11.83 ± 0.39 years). Participants completed the Physical Activity Questionnaire for Older Children, the Children’s Physical Self-Perception Profile and the Pubertal Development Scale. Results indicated that the girls were relatively active and physical self-perceptions were significantly and moderately correlated with physical activity. There were no differences in physical activity between maturation stages. There was evidence of an inverse relationship between aspects of physical self-perceptions and maturation, but not with chronological age. This study has identified preliminary evidence for an interaction between maturation, physical self-perceptions and physical activity, but longitudinal research is required to examine this in more detail.