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Multi-disciplinary robust design of variable speed wind turbines

Minisci, Edmondo and Campobasso, Michele Sergio and Dellantonio, Michele and Montecucco, Andrea and Vasile, Massimiliano (2011) Multi-disciplinary robust design of variable speed wind turbines. In: Eurogen 2011 Conference, 2011-09-14 - 2011-11-16.

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Abstract

This paper addresses the preliminary robust multi-disciplinary design of small wind turbines. The turbine to be designed is assumed to be connected to the grid by means of power electronic converters. The main input parameter is the yearly wind distribution at the selected site, and it is represented by means of a Weibull distribution. The objective function is the electrical energy delivered yearly to the grid. Aerodynamic and electrical characteristics are fully coupled and modelled by means of low- and medium-fidelity models. Uncertainty affecting the blade geometry is considered, and a multi-objective hybrid evolutionary algorithm code is used to maximise the mean value of the yearly energy production and minimise its variance.