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Haversian canal structures can be associated with size effects in cortical bone

Frame, Jamie Campbell and Wheel, Marcus and Riches, Philip (2012) Haversian canal structures can be associated with size effects in cortical bone. In: Euromech 534 Colloquium: Advanced experimental approaches and inverse problems in tissue biomechanics, 2012-05-29 - 2012-05-31.

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Abstract

Prediction of periprosthetic failure may be improved by an improved model of bone elasticity which includes microstructural information. Micropolar theory facilitates such information to be included in a continuum model. We assessed the extent of bone’s micropolar behaviour in bending both numerically and experimentally. The numerical model was consistent with micropolar behaviour, and experimental results exhibited size effects that may have been confounded by surface roughness effects, as predicted numerically.