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Evocation and experiential seduction: Updating choice-sets modelling

Prentice, R. (2006) Evocation and experiential seduction: Updating choice-sets modelling. Tourism Management, 27 (6). pp. 1153-1170. ISSN 0261-5177

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Abstract

This paper operationalises discourses on affects-as-information in terms of destination imagining and choosing. Evoked sets are conceptualised not simply as destinations, but as destinations in terms of imagery, knowledge and familiarity; forming Unusual Selling Points (USPs) or their standardised equivalent, Standardised Selling Points (SSPs). USPs and SSPs are each in turn categorised threefold, as utility, experiential and symbolic selling points. Action sets are conceptualised not just as destinations but as destinations-as-propensity to visit. This conceptualisation of decision making is illustrated in terms of British consumers' evocations of Scandinavia and their propensity to visit Scandinavian countries. One element of familiarity is found to be disproportionately important in the associations between evoked and action sets: experiential familiarity, namely seduction by experience.