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Design and performance of IEEE 802.15.4 compliant MMSE receivers

Scott, K.E.L. and Stewart, R.W. (2004) Design and performance of IEEE 802.15.4 compliant MMSE receivers. In: Conference Record of the Thirty-Eighth Asilomar Conference on Signals, Systems and Computers, 2004. IEEE, New York, pp. 2051-2055. ISBN 0780386221

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Abstract

IEEE 802.15.4 compliant design forms the basis of ZigBee technology. Intended for low-power, short range sensor networks, these devices are likely to operate in offices and factories: environments with strong multipath channel components. This research introduces a novel adaptive MMSE receiver design for the ISM 2.4 GHz band, comprising a bank of adaptive MMSE correlators. Design concentrates on methods for the efficient training of each correlator and on de-multiplexing the data after the correlation process. Results show a BER performance comparison of the MMSE receiver design with a traditional correlation receiver. Although the adaptive receiver adds complexity to the transceiver, the improved performance could aid coexistence with other technologies or allow a longer range of operation.