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The Department of Computer & Information Sciences hosts The Mobiquitous Lab, which investigates user behaviour on mobile devices and emerging ubiquitous computing paradigms. The Strathclyde iSchool Research Group specialises in understanding how people search for information and explores interactive search tools that support their information seeking and retrieval tasks, this also includes research into information behaviour and engagement.

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Influence of microstructure and stress on short intergranular stress corrosion crack growth in austenitic stainless steel type 304

Rahimi, Salaheddin and Marrow, James (2008) Influence of microstructure and stress on short intergranular stress corrosion crack growth in austenitic stainless steel type 304. In: 17th European Conference on Fracture, 2008-09-02 - 2008-09-05.

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Abstract

Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) causes failures in austenitic stainless steels when the appropriate electrochemical, metallurgical and mechanical conditions exist. In this study, the effects of time, applied stress, residual stress and microstructure on population of short crack nuclei has been investigated in sensitised type 304 austenitic stainless steel, tested under static load in an acidified potassium tetrathionate (K2S4O6) environment. Statistical analysis, using the Gumbel distribution method, enables analysis of the growth rate of short crack nuclei. This methodology is being developed, in order to quantitatively evaluate the influence of grain boundary engineering and surface finishing on crack nucleation.