Picture of boy being examining by doctor at a tuberculosis sanatorium

Understanding our future through Open Access research about our past...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Centre for the Social History of Health & Healthcare (CSHHH), based within the School of Humanities, and considered Scotland's leading centre for the history of health and medicine.

Research at CSHHH explores the modern world since 1800 in locations as diverse as the UK, Asia, Africa, North America, and Europe. Areas of specialism include contraception and sexuality; family health and medical services; occupational health and medicine; disability; the history of psychiatry; conflict and warfare; and, drugs, pharmaceuticals and intoxicants.

Explore the Open Access research of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Image: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Wellcome Collection - CC-BY.

Impact of distributed antenna system in inter-cell interference

Tong, F. and Glover, I.A. and Pennock, S. and Shepherd, P. (2004) Impact of distributed antenna system in inter-cell interference. In: 7th European Conference on Wireless Technology, 2004-10-11 - 2004-10-12.

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

A distributed antenna diversity system can he effective in combating the effects of shadowing, but this results in some antenna units being closer to adjacent cells. Studying this in a free space propagation environment we show that a distributed antenna has marginally worse iutercell interference than a single antenna at the centre of a cell when the total transmission power in the two systems are equal. We also show that the orientation of the distributed antenna influences the inter-cell interference. However, when downlink transmission power is controlled to produce constant signal-to-noise ratio acrass the cell, the distributed antenna system is seen to yield significantly better interference performance than the single antenna system