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Estimating the extractability of potentially toxic metals in urban soils: A comparison of several extracting solutions

Davidson, Christine (2007) Estimating the extractability of potentially toxic metals in urban soils: A comparison of several extracting solutions. Environmental Pollution. pp. 713-722. ISSN 0269-7491

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Abstract

Metals released by the extraction with aqua regia, EDTA, dilute HCl and sequential extraction (SE) by the BCR protocol were studied in urban soils of Sevilla, Torino, and Glasgow. By multivariate analysis, the amounts of Cu, Pb and Zn liberated by any method were statistically associated with one another, whereas other metals were not. The mean amounts of all metals extracted by HCl and by SE were well correlated, but SE was clearly underestimated by HCl. Individual data for Cu, Pb and Zn by both methods were correlated only if each city was considered separately. Other metals gave poorer relationships. Similar conclusions were reached comparing EDTA and HCl, with much lower values for EDTA. Dilute HCl extraction cannot thus be recommended for general use as alternative to BCR SE in urban soils.