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Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

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Column leaching and sorption experiments to assess the mobility of potentially toxic elements in industrially contaminated land

Anderson, Peter and Davidson, Christine and Duncan, A L and Littlejohn, D and Ure, Allan M. and Garden, L M (2000) Column leaching and sorption experiments to assess the mobility of potentially toxic elements in industrially contaminated land. Journal of Environmental Monitoring, 2 (3). pp. 234-239. ISSN 1464-0325

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Abstract

Made-up ground collected from layers of a trial pit excavated on a former industrial site was treated with artificial rainwater in a series of column leaching and sorption experiments. Metal mobility and the ability of various layers of material obtained from the pit to act as sources or sinks of potentially toxic elements were assessed. Samples from different layers varied in their abilities to raise the pH of rainwater applied at pH 3.5 and 4.3, and this was reflected in the amounts of metals mobilised by the rainwater as it percolated through the soil column. Material from the top two layers of the pit released cadmium, copper, manganese, lead, nickel and zinc to the aqueous phase, but the lower layers, with higher buffering capacity, were able to resist acidification even when the equivalent of 12 months' rainfall (western UK) was applied. Column sorption experiments confirmed the ability of material from layer 4 (48–50 cm) to take up copper, manganese and zinc. Metals were determined in the leachates by flame and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and principle anions by ion chromatography.