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Time delay estimation for UHF signals in PD location of transformers

Yang, L. and Judd, M.D. and Bennoch, C.J. (2004) Time delay estimation for UHF signals in PD location of transformers. In: 2004 Annual Report Conference on Electrical Insulation and Dielectric Phenomena, 2004. CEIDP '04., 2004-10-17 - 2004-10-20.

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Abstract

Time delay estimation (TDE) is essential for PD location using the UHF technique. However, noise and effects of multi-path propagation are two main problems affecting the accuracy of the estimate. Comparing two methods, which are based on cumulative energy curve and power curve respectively, a cross correlation based method is employed to achieve the estimation. A high-pass filter is applied to the UHF signal to eliminate operating noises. The phase characteristic of the filter is designed to be linear for making the time delay a constant in terms of frequency. A window in the time domain is selected to reduce the effect of multi-path propagation.